events at red emma's

@ Red Emma's

Join Baltimore Asian Resistance in Solidarity, BARS, for a film screening and discussion in celebration of Asian Pacific Islander Americans Heritage Month. The film Sramik Awaaz: Workers Voices, is a documentary on the labor movement in Bangladesh. It is a collaboration between Law@theMargins Editor Chaumtoli Huq and documentary filmmaker Mohammed Romel.  The documentary focuses on workers in the garment industry, highlighting their organizing efforts, educating others on trade union rights, developing female leadership, and building worldwide allies.

@ Red Emma's

In the United States, both struggles against oppression and the gains made by various movements for equality have often been led by Black people. Still, though progress has regularly been fueled by radical Black efforts, liberal politics are based on ideas and practices that impede the continued progress of Black America. Building on their original essay “The Anarchism of Blackness,” (link: https://roarmag.org/magazine/black-liberation-anti-fascism/ ) Zoé Samudzi and William C. Anderson make the case for a new program of self-defense and transformative politics for Black Americans, one rooted in an anarchistic framework that the authors liken to the Black experience itself. This book argues against compromise and negotiation with intolerance. It is a manifesto for everyone who is ready to continue progressing towards liberation.

"As Black as Resistance is a searing indictment of the U.S. settler colonial project and a call to action to save ourselves from the forces of oppression and tyranny. The philosophy of the book might well be summarized as 'we’re all we’ve got.' This book appears in a chaotic time when the gap between rich and poor continues to grow, when climate change is causing mass devastation, when fascism appears resurgent and when the ever-expanding carceral state is criminalizing and prematurely killing millions. In this context, William C. Anderson and Zoé Samudzi insist that our current political moment demands that we reject liberalism and embrace a more radical program to transform our conditions. They argue persuasively that grounding ourselves in the Black radical tradition offers the best path forward toward freedom and liberation." —Mariame Kaba, from the Foreword

Who gets to be where? The Arsenal of Exclusion & Inclusion examines some of the policies, practices, and physical artifacts that have been used by architects, planners, policymakers, developers, real estate brokers, community activists, and other urban actors in the United States to draw, erase, or redraw the lines that divide. The Arsenal inventories these weapons of exclusion and inclusion, describes how they have been used, and speculates about how they might be deployed (or retired) for the sake of more open cities in which more people have access to more places. With contributions from over fifty architects, planners, geographers, historians, and journalists, The Arsenal offers a wide-ranging view of the forces that shape our cities.




Polyamorous people and communities can appear, at first glance, to be very open and welcoming. In many case, they don't take the time to get introspective about why they may come across as unfriendly or inaccessible to people of color. Love's Not Color Blind is a book about what we can do to change that landscape. Join author Kevin Patterson for a workshop on intersectional polyamory and a personally-driven discussion on how race can impact polyamory on both individual and community levels.

@ Red Emma's

Join the BSO and Pulitzer Prize winning composer Du Yun for a free talk on exploring the idea of making classical music a more communal experience 

@ Red Emma's

NEGRO is a docu-series exploring identity, colonization, racism and the African Diaspora in Latin America and the Caribbean and the historical and present-day class color complex among Latinxs. Through candid interviews, the social manifestations and consequences of the deep-seated color and class complex is deconstructed. There will be a 47-minute screening of the feature length documentary followed by a discussion on practical, healing, everyday strategies we can employ in challenging, deconstructing, and dismantling white supremacist values through academic, social, and familial spaces.

@ Red Emma's

Lisa Ko’s uncompromising, timely debut novel, THE LEAVERS, not only won the PEN/Bellwether Prize for Fiction – awarded by Barbara Kingsolver to a novel that addresses contemporary issues of social justice – last year, but was also a finalist for the National Book Award and the Barnes & Noble Discover Awards. Ko’s penetrating and emotionally rich work courageously tackles rarely-talked-about subtleties behind larger issues of immigration and adoption as it looks at questions of what it means to belong. Garnering tremendous critical acclaim nationwide, THE LEAVERS became one of the best books of 2017.


When eleven-year-old Deming Guo’s mother, Polly, an undocumented Chinese immigrant, fails to come home from work one day at the nail salon, he is left on his own. Adopted by two white college professors, he moves from the Bronx to upstate New York, where his name is changed to Daniel Wilkinson and his well-intentioned new parents try to give him an all-American life. But the boy, haunted by his mother’s disappearance and memories of all he has been forced to leave behind, struggles to embrace fully this new reality. Told from the perspective of both Daniel –as he grows into a troubled young man–and Polly, the narrative unravels the unnerving mystery of Polly’s disappearance and the difficult choice she is forced to make.



@ Red Emma's

In Fighting For Space: How a Group of Drug Users Transformed One City’s Struggle with Addiction; author, Travis Lupick, recounts how Downtown Eastside activists marched in the streets to force politicians to change how we respond to the challenge of addiction. Drawing from the experience of the drug crisis in Vancouver in the 90’s. Lupick’s work explores a history of harm-reduction activism that connects the story in the book with the Downtown East-side’s response to the fentanyl crisis today. In the 1990s, drug overdoses killed hundreds and then thousands of people in Vancouver. Eventually, the city responded in incredible ways. Politicians listened to the demands of drug users and that led Vancouver to establish the continent’s first supervised-injection facility, Insite. Solutions to Vancouver’s crisis of the ’90s came from the drug users themselves.  It was a political war that took nearly two decades but the activists eventually won. Today Vancouver is championed for pioneering harm reduction. Lupick will talk about where those activists are now, what roles they’ve taken on since fentanyl arrived, and what these drug users and their allies argue must happen next to begin to reduce overdose deaths.


@ Red Emma's

Join us in support of the activists of the Mountain Valley Pipeline.

@ Red Emma's

With My Head Unbowed is a dual spoken-written, auditory-literary collection of emphatic poetry discussing family, women empowerment and the Black experience by Spoken Word artist Lady Brion. The book is rhythmic, hard- hitting and soulful in its unapologetic telling of the author's truth.

@ Red Emma's

Plus 20% off all books this week! 

After five years at 30 W. North Ave., we are gearing up for another big move and expansion! Come help us celebrate and say goodbye to the old space this Saturday.

And did we mention that all our books are on sale? Stock up for the summer and help lighten our moving load. 20% off all this week until we close.

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