Linda Morris presents "Cherry Hill: Raising Successful Black Children in Jim Crow Baltimore"

Sunday December 9, 2:00PM

@ Red Emma's

Thousands of Black children grew up in Cherry Hill, a post WWII planned suburban community containing a public housing project on a southeastern peninsula of Baltimore City. In an era of public investment in quality housing, these children had a sense of being loved, being free, being safe, and above all, having the space they needed to stretch out and enjoy small town living. They could play all day with their friends, skate and ride their bikes all over town, and chase the ice cream man’s truck, with the admonishment to be home by the time the streetlights came on. The author was one of those children, and she rallied sixty or so of her Cherry Hill contemporaries to share what life was like for them in what they know to be a special place and time.

Linda G. Morris was born and raised in Baltimore, MD. She attended Baltimore City Public Schools, including Cherry Hill Elementary School #159, Garrison Jr. High School, and Edmondson High School. Linda graduated from Towson State University in 1969 with a B.S. in Sociology. After working as a Baltimore City Social Work Assistant, Linda left Baltimore to work for the Federal Government in the field of Equal Employment Opportunity. She started out in Richmond, VA, and spent most of her Federal career in the Washington, DC area. During her Federal tenure, she worked at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Patent and Trademark Office, and she retired as the EEO Complaints Branch Manager for the National Institutes of Health in 2003. Linda began freelance writing in the mid-1970s; her work appearing in Essence and Baltimore Magazine. Linda now resides in Germantown, Maryland, a suburb of Washington, DC.

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